Leaving no one behind: The SDG challenge of reaching the last mile

Past event

Digital & Data Governance
starts
ends
Read the report
Leaving no one behind: The SDG challenge of reaching the last mile

Summary

Efforts to promote development need to focus on hard-to-reach areas, experts told a Friends of Europe Policymakers’ Dinner, “Leaving no one behind – the SDG challenge of reaching the last mile” on 5 June 2018.

About three-quarters of the world’s poor live in remote areas with insufficient access to education, healthcare, clean water and sanitation. The percentage of children not in school in such areas is twice as high as in urban areas, and children are 1.7 times more likely to die before their fifth birthday in comparison to urban areas. That makes it urgent to push aid efforts well beyond cities, which often present the most-visible challenges.

“We found that there is a skills gap for young people,” said Naoko Ueda, Deputy Director of the Development Centre at the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). “Even when they are educated they are not incorporated into the formal market. We need to avoid making youth disenchanted from governments. If youth are disenchanted with their countries, that can lead to instability.”

The United Nations’ Agenda 2030 calls for leaving no one behind and ensuring that all sustainable development goals (SDGs) are “met for all nations and peoples and for all segments of society”. An implication is that development actors think beyond per capita GDP and reach out to the last mile: the poorest of the poor, the most geographically distant and the most marginalised – with a special emphasis on women and girls.

“The key definition is that the SDGs are a matter for all in society,” said Stefano Manservisi, Director-General for International Cooperation and Development (DEVCO) at the European Commission. “That means, first and foremost, that we reflect on all societies. It means a whole-government approach and questions about the governance of the world.”

Tackling these and other challenges requires new approaches through innovative development, business and financial policies. These must take place at national, regional and international level. “We learned that what was more impactful and powerful was skills and training,” said Beatriz Perez, Chief Public Affairs, Communications and Sustainability Officer for The Coca-Cola Company. “It is less about putting vaccines on trucks and more about people looking after refrigeration and training people to operate facilities. This was really important.”

There are some examples of successful investment programmes in Africa – notably in Ethiopia, which was once known for devastating famines, but is now developing a base of light industry. “Ethiopia is on an industrialisation path thanks to growth and planning,” said Li Yong, Director General of the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO). The country is now home to a growing number of industrial parks, which focus on labour-intensive sectors such as apparel, textiles and food processing. “The poverty rate has fallen from 44% in 2000 to 23.5% in 2015-16.”

Leaving no one behind - The SDG challenge of reaching the last mile

Leaving no one behind: The SDG challenge of reaching the last mile

Event recording

Leaving no one behind: The SDG challenge of reaching the last mile

Start playback
About

About

This event is part of our Development Policy Forum (DPF), which brings together a number of important development actors, including the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ), the Agence Française de Développement (AFD), the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA), the European Investment Bank (EIB), the United Nations and the World Bank. Reflecting the growing role of the private sector in development, the DPF has now welcomed Coca-Cola and Eni to the forum. The DPF contributes to the global and European conversation on inclusive development. Through its activities and publications, the DPF reflects the rapidly-changing global debate on growth and development and seeks to encourage a multi-stakeholdered, fresh, up-to-date thinking on the multiple challenges facing the development community.


IMAGE CREDITS: Feed My Starving Children (FMSC)/Flickr

Schedule

Schedule

Welcome cocktail and registration of participants
Leaving no one behind Expand Leaving no one behind

The SDG challenge of reaching the last mile

Agenda  2030 calls for leaving no one behind and ensuring that all sustainable development goals (SDGs) are “met for all nations and peoples and for all segments of society.” This means ending poverty in all its forms everywhere and reaching out to the “last mile”: those who are at the base of the pyramid, the poorest of the poor, the most geographically distant and the most marginalised – with a special emphasis on women and girls. In fact, 75 percent of the world’s poor live in rural areas with insufficient access to education, healthcare, clean water and sanitation. The percentage of children not in school in rural areas is twice as high as in urban areas, and children in rural areas are 1.7 times more likely to die before their fifth birthday in comparison to urban areas. Furthermore, women and girls living in poverty face multiple forms of discrimination and marginalisation, thus facing increased risks of violence. Tackling these and other challenges requires  new approaches that explicitly target and prioritize the “last mile”,  through innovative development, business and financial policies and actions, at national, regional and international level.

  • How can emerging technologies, especially digital innovations, help shift the path from poverty to prosperity in the “last mile”?
  • Would facilitating more private sector activity in areas such as healthcare, sanitation and education help reduce inequality on the long term?
  • What lessons from the EU’s own experiences in promoting inclusiveness  can be translated into its international development policies?
  • How can cities, governments and the international community make “the feminisation” of poverty more important to women lives and encourage empowerment at a grassroots?

Moderator

Shada Islam

Managing Director at New Horizons Project

Partners

Insights

view all insights

Next Event

view all events
Track title

Category

00:0000:00
Stop playback
Video title

Category

Close

We use cookies to improve your online experience.
For more information, visit our privacy policy

Africa initiative logo

Dismiss