Europe's energy outlook: The race against the clock

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Climate, Energy & Sustainability
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Europe's energy outlook: The race against the clock

Summary

here is an increased interest in a binding global agreement, in particular coming from China, and more pressure from investors for governments to sign up to a deal in Paris in 2015, pointed out Paul Watkinson, Head of the French Climate Negotiation Team at Friends of Europe’s this year’s Energy Summit.

However, many panelists remained unconvinced and there was a disagreement over whether the new EU 2030 commitments were bold enough.

“October’s Council conclusions are “the most nationalistic and anti-European I’ve seen since I’ve been in Brussels”, said Claude Turmes, member of the European Parliament Committee on Industry, Research and Energy. He also pointed out that if Europe had a 40% energy efficiency target, as many people had argued for, we would be able to wean ourselves off Russian gas and massively reduce the continent’s energy insecurity.”

The renewable energy target was also called into question as responsible for high energy prices currently in Europe. “We need to avoid becoming too technology-focused and let the market decide which technologies are the winning one. Stop the ‘renewable only’ mantra”, said Bryony Worthington, UK Shadow Minister for Energy and Climate.

Will the new Juncker team deliver on future EU energy policy and square the circle between climate, competitiveness and energy security?

Energy Summit: Europe's energy outlook

About

About

The global low-carbon market is now worth €4tn, employs 6.5m people and is expanding rapidly at over 4% a year, as more and more countries and regions are working to reduce their CO2 emissions, to price or tax carbon, to increase the deployment of renewables and to enhance energy efficiency.

 

Schedule

Schedule

Welcome coffee and registration of participants
SESSION I: Europe's battle to stay in the global low-carbon race
Expand SESSION I: Europe's battle to stay in the global low-carbon race

The global low-carbon market is now worth €4tn, employs 6.5m people and is expanding rapidly at over 4% a year, as more and more countries and regions are working to reduce their CO2 emissions, to price or tax carbon, to increase the deployment of renewables and to enhance energy efficiency. Europe still accounts for 22% of the global low-carbon investment and holds the highest number of green technology patents, but countries like the U.S., China and South Korea are catching up in low-carbon innovation. Renewable energy has been booming worldwide, with over 100 countries having set renewable energy targets and introduced renewable support measures, and with 70% of new wind power capacity and 40% of new photovoltaic panels installed outside Europe in 2012. Europe also now lags behind Asian countries in some energy efficiency programmes and technologies for industry. Key questions for Europe are what needs to be done to stay with the leaders and ahead of the game in international climate negotiations, and what are the consequences of falling behind? What factors explain Europe’s recent slowdown in clean energy investment; can low-carbon innovation and investment be spurred only by market-based instruments if we are to scrap energy subsidies? How ambitious a 2030 climate and energy framework and R&D strategy are needed to attract the capital for low-carbon technologies to Europe and prevent Europe’s clean energy companies from relocating abroad? What policies could help the EU find an optimal balance between protecting traditional sectors and encouraging new industries? And how can companies take greater advantage of a low-carbon economy?

Speakers

Matthew Arndt

Head of Environment and Climate at the European Investment Bank (EIB)

Chris Beddoes

Director General of FuelsEurope

Jos Delbeke

European Commission Director General for Climate Action

Christopher Delbrück

CEO of E.ON Global Commodities SE

Karsten Neuhoff

Head of Climate Policy Department at DIW Berlin and author author of “Climate Policy after Copenhagen: The Role of Carbon Pricing”

Co-moderators

Giles Merritt

Founder

Chris Burns

Strategic Adviser at Friends of Europe

Coffee break
SESSION II: Energy efficiency: Europe’s first fuel
Expand SESSION II: Energy efficiency: Europe’s first fuel

Investments in energy efficiency worldwide amounted in 2011 to $147bn-$300bn, with energy savings outweighing the output from most energy sources, says the International Energy Agency. Energy efficiency promises cost savings, new jobs and reduced energy dependence, and is also widely seen as the most cost-effective way of reducing CO2 emissions while protecting both energy-intensive industries and household consumers from price rises. Yet despite these benefits, Europe’s energy saving potential is being underexploited and most of the energy efficiency investment and business growth is happening outside Europe. Many EU member states have still to transpose the Energy Efficiency Directive, and of its 2020 energy and climate targets, the non-binding 20% energy efficiency target is the only one the EU isn’t on track to meet. What best explains EU member states’ insufficient action or political will? How can we break the deadlocks on greater energy efficiency in buildings, transport and industry, and maximise energy efficient technologies and services? Do we need a new 2030 energy efficiency target to increase stability for investors, or could investment be driven solely by a robust carbon price? Where might the increased investment and innovation needed come from, and could momentum be spurred by energy efficiency obligation schemes to be in place in all EU countries this year? To what extent could innovative solutions and technologies, like smart meters and big data that allow both utilities and consumers to manage the energy use, revolutionise the energy efficiency market?

Speakers

Claudio De Vincenti

Italian Deputy Minister for Economic Development

Ingrid Holmes

Director at Third Generation Environmentalism (E3G) and Member of the EU High Level Group on Sustainable Finance

Auke Lont

Chief Executive Officer of Statnett

Claude Turmes

Minister for Energy of Luxembourg

Moderator

Giles Merritt

Founder

Chris Burns

Strategic Adviser at Friends of Europe

Coffee break
SESSION III: Energy union: Searching for the balance between energy security, climate policy and competitiveness
Expand SESSION III: Energy union: Searching for the balance between energy security, climate policy and competitiveness

Fears that the EU’s dependence on energy imports continues to be above half of its energy consumption have been pushed once again to the top of the political agenda by the Ukraine crisis, overshadowing the EU’s long-term climate strategy. It’s far from a new problem, but diverging national interests and energy strategies have long obstructed progress on energy security and the completion of the internal energy market. The deepest divisions refer to the alternative energy-mix choices. While some countries give priority to investments in domestic sources of renewable energy, others seek their energy independence in burning more coal, in new nuclear power projects and in a dash for shale gas. There are however serious concerns that rehabilitating coal could jeopardise Europe’s CO2 emission reductions goals at a time when tackling climate change is more urgent than ever with new climate deal negotiations underway. Should Europe scale back its climate ambitions in the name of energy security or could low-carbon technology and energy efficiency be the drivers of energy independence and economic competitiveness? What are the prospects for increased natural gas imports from the U.S., European shale gas production, and carbon capture and storage (CCS)? What subsidies and support mechanisms might make sense in view of securing clean, affordable and reliable energy supplies? Where should the funding come from to upgrade Europe’s energy infrastructures, improve cross-border grid connections and boost energy storage? What lessons did we learn from past disruptions in the supply of Russian gas; is it possible that the Ukraine crisis might finally end national divisions and lay the foundations of an energy union? If so, what should it look like in order to solve Europe’s ‘energy trilemma’?

Speakers

David Buchan

Senior Research Fellow at the Oxford Institute for Energy Studies

Fulco van Lede

Member of the Management Board of SHV Energy and former CEO of SHV Energy China

Linda DuCharme

Vice President Europe, Russia and Caspian at ExxonMobil Gas & Power Marketing

Mechthild Wörsdörfer

Deputy Director-General for Energy at the European Commission

Bryony Worthington

Executive Director, Environmental Defense Fund Europe

Co-moderators

Giles Merritt

Founder

Chris Burns

Strategic Adviser at Friends of Europe

Speakers

Speakers

Photo of Matthew Arndt
Matthew Arndt

Head of Environment and Climate at the European Investment Bank (EIB)

Show more information on Matthew Arndt

Matthew Arndt has more than 20 years of experience in sustainable transport solutions and urban development. In his current role, he heads the EIB Environment, Climate and Social Office, which has a mandate to provide expert advice and support on climate change, environmental and social matters, in view of enhancing the quality of the projects financed by the Bank. His responsibilities include assisting in building the Bank’s climate change strategy.

Photo of Chris Beddoes
Chris Beddoes

Director General of FuelsEurope

Show more information on Chris Beddoes

Chris Beddoes is Director General of FuelsEurope (former EUROPIA), the voice in Brussels of the European petroleum refining industry. He is also Director General of a sister organisation CONCAWE, which carries out research on environmental, health and safety issues relevant to the oil industry. He graduated in Chemical Engineering and has over 30 years of experience with oil refining, supply and distribution.

Photo of Jos Delbeke
Jos Delbeke

European Commission Director General for Climate Action

Show more information on Jos Delbeke

Jos Delbeke became the first Director General of the European Commission’s Directorate General for Climate Action, after having served as Deputy Director General of DG Environment. He participated in several negotiation processes on climate change and energy at the inter-institutional and international levels and has been a key player in developing Europe’s international climate change strategy.

Photo of Christopher Delbrück
Christopher Delbrück

CEO of E.ON Global Commodities SE

Show more information on Christopher Delbrück

With more than 18 years of experience in the energy sector, Christopher Delbrück is currently Chief Executive Officer of E.ON Global Commodities (EGC), the energy trading business of E.ON and one of the leading participants in international wholesale energy markets. Under his leadership, EGC is responsible for optimizing one of Europe’s broadest and most diverse power and gas portfolios and for identifying new opportunities to create value in global energy commodity markets.

Photo of Karsten Neuhoff
Karsten Neuhoff

Head of Climate Policy Department at DIW Berlin and author author of “Climate Policy after Copenhagen: The Role of Carbon Pricing”

Show more information on Karsten Neuhoff

Karsten Neuhoff is expert in climate and energy economics. His research focuses mainly on climate policy, emissions trading, energy market design, renewable integration and technology policy and he coordinates several European and international projects in these areas. He is also a member of the research network Climate Strategies and leading author of its report “Staying with the leaders – Europe’s path to a successful low-carbon economy”.

Photo of Claudio De Vincenti
Claudio De Vincenti

Italian Deputy Minister for Economic Development

Show more information on Claudio De Vincenti

Key figure in Italian economic policies and Deputy Minister of Economic Development for the Renzi Government, De Vincenti holds the Italian energy portfolio. As current chair of the EU Transport, Telecommunications and Energy Council, his presidency priorities in the field of energy policy include the framework for climate and energy beyond 2020, with a special focus on energy efficiency; EU energy security; the completion of the single energy market; and external energy policy.

Photo of Ingrid Holmes
Ingrid Holmes

Director at Third Generation Environmentalism (E3G) and Member of the EU High Level Group on Sustainable Finance

Show more information on Ingrid Holmes

Ingrid Holmes’ work focuses on how to better target financing for the low carbon transition in Europe as well as how to accelerate it by reforming capital markets. Prior to working for E3G, she worked for Climate Change Capital, a boutique investment bank specialising in low carbon investment, and as Energy and Environment Adviser in the UK Parliament and Science Policy Adviser at the Department for Environment. She also worked for nine years in science publishing and journalism, with her last role based in New York working for the Nature Publishing Group. Holmes has recently been appointed member of the European Union High Level Expert Group on Sustainable Finance.

Photo of Auke Lont
Auke Lont

Chief Executive Officer of Statnett

Show more information on Auke Lont

Auke Lont has more than 20 years of experience in the energy industry acquired through several leading positions in both Norwegian and international energy companies. He is currently Chief Executive Officer of Statnett, a Norwegian state owned enterprise responsible for electricity transmission and distribution in Norway and thus operating and developing the country’s power grid, and Chairman of the Institute for Energy Technology, Norway.

Claude Turmes
Claude Turmes

Minister for Energy of Luxembourg

Show more information on Claude Turmes

Claude Turmes has been the Minister for Energy of Luxembourg since 2018. Within his role, he leads a pilot study that aims to determine the ecological transition of Luxembourg and achieve a zero-carbon cross-border country by 2050. Prior to joining government, Turmes was a long-standing member of the European Parliament, where he vice-chaired the parliamentary group of the Green Party. He was also the rapporteur of the directive on renewable energies, the second directive on the liberalisation of the energy market and the energy efficiency directive.

Photo of David Buchan
David Buchan

Senior Research Fellow at the Oxford Institute for Energy Studies

Show more information on David Buchan

Former journalist, Buchan has over 30 years of experience covering energy and defense for Financial Times in Brussels, Washington DC and Paris. At the Oxford Institute for Energy Studies he specialises in European Union energy and climate policy, and has published several books and reports, including “Energy and Climate Change: Europe at the Crossroads“ (2009), and more recently “Europe’s energy security: caught between short-term needs and long-term goals”.

Photo of Fulco van Lede
Fulco van Lede

Member of the Management Board of SHV Energy and former CEO of SHV Energy China

Show more information on Fulco van Lede

Fulco van Lede has pursued a long-standing career at SHV Energy, occupying various senior positions, such as Store Manager MAKRO SHV in Philippines, CEO of SHV Energy China and currently Management Board member of SHV Energy. This family-owned multinational company provides over 30 million domestic and commercial customers in three continents with decentralised and personalised energy solutions and services. It’s main focus in on LPG, LNG, biomass and renewable energy.

Photo of Linda DuCharme
Linda DuCharme

Vice President Europe, Russia and Caspian at ExxonMobil Gas & Power Marketing

Show more information on Linda DuCharme

Linda DuCharme has more than 25 years of experience working for ExxonMobil. She assumed the role of Vice President Gas & Power Marketing for Europe, Russia and Caspian in 2011 and is now responsible for marketing of ExxonMobil’s natural gas and natural gas liquids, natural gas infrastructure and marketing joint ventures in Europe, Russia and the Caspian. Her previous responsibilities include managing the European gas supply, the natural gas liquids and infrastructure for Europe and flowing gas businesses in Qatar, Australia, and Malaysia, as well as the global ExxonMobil power portfolio.

Mechthild Wörsdörfer
Mechthild Wörsdörfer

Deputy Director-General for Energy at the European Commission

Show more information on Mechthild Wörsdörfer

Building on her decades-long experience in energy policy, Mechthild Wörsdörfer is in charge of the European Commission’s work on the coordination of the just and green energy transition. Before taking up her current position, she worked as the director for sustainability, technology and outlooks at the International Energy Agency. Prior to that, Wörsdörfer worked on a wide range of energy files at the European Commission, from renewables, energy efficiency and innovation to the 2030 Energy and Climate Framework. She previously served in the cabinet of Erkki Liikanen, during his term as European Commissioner for Enterprise Policy and Information Society.

Bryony Worthington
Bryony Worthington

Executive Director, Environmental Defense Fund Europe

Show more information on Bryony Worthington

Bryony Worthington is a Labour peer, Shadow Minister for Energy and Climate Change in the House of Lords and a prolific campaigner for action to tackle climate change. She wrote the very first report in the UK calling for the introduction of ‘carbon budgets’ and was the brains behind the Friends of the Earth ‘Big Ask’ campaign. She set up Sandbag, a not-for-profit campaign group dedicated to fighting climate change and promoting a low-carbon future via the emissions trading systems.

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