Designing for inclusion: how urban planning can make or break a city

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Designing for inclusion: how urban planning can make or break a city

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While cities may be hubs of prosperity and opportunity for some, a lack of representation can mean that others suffer from design which perpetuates socio-economic disparities and inequalities. But as designers and city planners become increasingly innovative, they are seeking out new ways to overcome these challenges and to create spaces which are more inclusive for all.

With urban landscapes already coming under reassessment due to COVID-19 and the climate emergency, this online Policy Insight debate will ask experts to reflect on the factors necessary to ensure that the cities of the future are not only sustainable and healthy – but also inclusive.

This debate is part of Friends of Europe’s Migration Action programme, which aims to examine the imperative of migration in the context of economic sustainability and demographics, as well as its impact on public services, communities and security.


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PHOTO CREDIT: Kaspars Upmanis/Unsplash

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Designing for inclusion: how urban planning can make or break a city Expand Designing for inclusion: how urban planning can make or break a city

For too long, the people responsible for designing urban spaces have lacked the diversity of those making use of the infrastructure. While cities may be hubs of prosperity and opportunity for some, a lack of representation can mean that others suffer from design which perpetuates socio-economic disparities and inequalities. But many cities are moving on from the status quo. From Brussels to Barcelona, inclusion-based thinking is gaining traction in the field of urban planning. Designers and city planners are increasingly innovative, aiming to create spaces which are more inclusive for all of a city’s inhabitants – men and women; newcomers and long-time residents; young and old. As the realities of COVID-19 and the climate emergency lead to a reassessment of the urban landscape, this online Policy Insight debate will look at the factors necessary to ensure that the cities of the future are not only sustainable and healthy – but also inclusive.

  • What are the essential elements of an inclusive city?
  • What unconscious biases must local administrators tackle to build better urban areas?
  • How will the fallout of the COVID-19 crisis change cities, and is this an opportunity to make them more inclusive?

speakers

Nour Harastani

Architect, Urban Researcher and Co-Founder of Syrbanism

Tau Tavengwa

Co-founder, Curator and Editor of Cityscapes Magazine

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Speakers

Speakers

Nour Harastani
Nour Harastani

Architect, Urban Researcher and Co-Founder of Syrbanism

Show more information on Nour Harastani

Nour Harastani is an architect and urban researcher with a background in social housing, informality and environmental design. In 2017 she co-founded the Syria-focused urban activism platform Syrbanism, where she focuses on issues including spatial justice, informality, urban laws and housing, land and property rights. Harastani also works as a senior architect and project manager at Carpaneto.Schoeningh Architekten in Berlin, focusing on inclusive urban development and creating new approaches to sustainable housing typologies and experimental shelter design. She previously worked at Damascus University as a research and teaching assistant.

Tau Tavengwa
Tau Tavengwa

Co-founder, Curator and Editor of Cityscapes Magazine

Show more information on Tau Tavengwa

Tau Tavengwa leads Cityscapes Magazine, a biannual print publication focused on presenting different ideas, narratives and perspectives on cities across Africa, Latin America and South Asia. Since 2010, the publication offers an alternative, Southern perspective on cities and urbanisation globally. Tavengwa is a 2018 Harvard University Loeb Fellow and is currently a Visiting Fellow at the London School of Economics’ LSE Cities, as well as a Research Fellow at the Max Planck Institute for Religious and Diversity Studies. With a background in architecture and museum design, he has curated several exhibitions on art, architecture and design, including City Desired which explored the depths and effects of inequality in Cape Town and South African cities in general.

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