Climate and Energy Outlook: Policy challenges and choices that will shape our common future

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Climate, Energy & Sustainability
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Climate and Energy Outlook: Policy challenges and choices that will shape our common future

Summary

SESSION I – Financing the world’s low-carbon transition

Conversation with James Hansen

SESSION II – The energy landscape 15 years from now

SESSION III – Fixing Europe’s electricity market(s)

About

About

With negotiations to seal the much hoped-for global climate agreement in their final leg, Friends of Europe’s 12th annual Climate and Energy Policy Summit will discuss the main challenges ahead for global leaders in view of ensuring affordable and secure energy in line with reducing CO2 emissions. Questions will include:

  • Will the new global climate agreement force businesses to shift their investment decisions?
  • What is the best way to finance the world’s low-carbon transition?
  • What new policies, technologies and actors will shake up the energy landscape in the years to come?
  • How different will the global energy-mix be in 2030 and where will gas, oil and coal fit into the low-carbon future?
  • What reforms are needed to fix Europe’s electricity market(s)?

This summit has a long-standing reputation as the ‘must-attend’ conference in Brussels and top-level personalities have always joined this platform as speakers. The few hundred participants will include EU and national policymakers, senior officials from international organisations, business representatives, NGO leaders, experts from the academic world and members of the international press from Brussels and throughout Europe.

Schedule

Schedule

Welcome coffee and registration of participants
SESSION I - Financing the world’s low-carbon transition
Expand SESSION I - Financing the world’s low-carbon transition

Now that the preparatory negotiations for the UN Paris conference are entering their final stages, attention is turning to financing the low-carbon transition without imposing unnecessary costs on private and business consumers and without endangering different countries’ energy security. The International Energy Agency has put the world’s total energy supply and energy efficiency investment needs by 2035 at a massive $53tn if the 2oC climate change target is to be met, a third of that amount needed to finance the development of low-carbon technologies. Yet so far there are few signs that today’s policies and market signals will make the existing energy investment trends more sustainable with the necessary speed and scale. Will the new global climate agreement force businesses to shift their investment decisions? What is the outlook for the fossil fuel divestment movement and would it necessarily lead to increased investment in clean energy? Which policies, ranging from emissions trading to taxation or subsidising energy sources, have proved most effective in leveraging private sector low-carbon investment? What innovative financing mechanisms and business models, such as green bonds or yieldcos, could help tap new sources of capital? How can industrialised countries work with less developed ones to embrace sustainable growth and shift away from the most carbon-intensive energy sources? And how should the new Paris agreement be to allay competitiveness concerns, should it aim for truly international solutions, like the linking of carbon markets or a global carbon tax?

Featuring

Carole Dieschbourg

Ministry of Sustainable Development and Infrastructure, Luxembourg and 2017 European Young Leader (EYL40)

Janos Pasztor

UN Assistant Secretary-General on Climate Change

Alan Synnott

Director of BlackRock Infrastructure Investment Group within BlackRock Alternative Investors (BAI)

Jonathan Taylor

Vice President for Climate and Environment at the European Investment Bank (EIB)ice President for Climate and Environment at the European Investment Bank (EIB)

Moderated by

Shada Islam

Managing Director at New Horizons Project

Coffee break
SESSION II - The energy landscape 15 years from now
Expand SESSION II - The energy landscape 15 years from now

The ongoing shifts in geostrategic power balances, successive revolutions in energy supply-and-demand, and volatile energy prices that are turning energy markets into casinos, are making the future course of energy markets hard to predict. But whatever the future holds, technological advances in the energy sector, combined with the political momentum for climate change, are certain to shake up the energy landscape as we know it today. What policies and which countries will drive global innovation in the energy sector, and where will Europe fit into this race? What new and unsuspected business actors could emerge, perhaps to take the lead? What disruptive technologies are likely to have the greatest impact on the world energy picture, and what elements will alter the competitive environment over the next 15 years? With electricity storage and battery technologies widely seen as imminent game-changers, what breakthroughs should be expected in the power and transport sectors? How different will the global energy mix be in 2030, and where will gas, oil and coal fit into the low-carbon future that is becoming a global goal? What are the unintended but potentially adverse consequences that switching to renewable energy sources and ’green’ technologies might bring; can it lead to a new minerals import dependency trap? And how could the current deadlocks barring the way to greater energy efficiency be overcome?

Featuring

Kamel Ben Naceur

Director for Sustainable Energy Policy and Technology at the International Energy Agency (IEA) and former Tunisia Minister for Industry, Energy and Mines

Sonja Chirico Indrebø

Senior Vice President for Strategy at the New Energy Solutions of Statoil

John Cooper

Executive Director of FuelsEurope

Seb Henbest

Head of Europe, Middle East & Africa at Bloomberg New Energy Finance (BNEF)

Moderated by

Shada Islam

Managing Director at New Horizons Project

Siobhan Hall

Senior Editor for EU energy policy at Platts

Coffee break
SESSION III - Fixing Europe’s electricity market(s)
Expand SESSION III - Fixing Europe’s electricity market(s)

Europe’s electricity sector urgently needs to be redesigned. The EU’s self-imposed deadline for completing the internal energy market expired last year, leaving Europe still with 28 electricity markets that are fragmented by divergent national energy policies, not properly connected to their neighbours and hit by weak competition. Consumers have too little control over their energy use, and Europe’s energy infrastructure, meanwhile, is ageing and has not been adequately adapted to the low-carbon transition. Mismatches between power shortages and oversupply, together with continuing regulatory uncertainties, mean there has been an EU-wide standstill in vitally important energy investment. What reforms are now needed to fix these problems and why are the policies that could provide the right price signals to encourage the necessary investment still lacking? What new market design would enable the integration of low-carbon generation technologies? How should policymakers secure generation adequacy while ensuring that markets and fair competition are not distorted and that heavier financial burdens aren’t placed on consumers? Is there a need for capacity mechanisms, or can security of supply be reached through cross-border interconnectivity, trading arrangements and storage capacity? How best can the EU’s 15% interconnection target be met and will it end up with ‘energy islands’? How can consumers be empowered to manage their energy use? Where is the EU’s Energy Union now heading, and how can it be used to encourage a greater coordination of national energy strategies?

Featuring

Marie-Pierre Fauconnier

Chairwoman of the Belgian National Regulatory Authority for Energy (CREG)

Fredrick Federley

Member of the European Parliament Committee on Industry, Research and Energy and Substitute of the Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety

Michel Matheu

Head of EU Strategy at Electricité de France (EDF)

Simon Skillings

Senior Associate at Third Generation Environmentalism (E3G)

Mechthild Wörsdörfer

Deputy Director-General for Energy at the European Commission

Moderated by

Shada Islam

Managing Director at New Horizons Project

Siobhan Hall

Senior Editor for EU energy policy at Platts

Speakers

Speakers

Carole Dieschbourg
Carole Dieschbourg

Ministry of Sustainable Development and Infrastructure, Luxembourg and 2017 European Young Leader (EYL40)

Show more information on Carole Dieschbourg

Carole Dieschbourg served as a municipal councillor in Echternach from 2011 to 2013, when she was appointed to the government as Minister of the Environment. At the time she was the youngest member of the cabinet and the only Green Minister of the Environment in Europe. Carole represented the European Union during the United Nations Conference on Climate Change (COP21) in Paris, which coincided with Luxembourg’s Presidency of the EU Council. Her role was to ensure that the EU had a coordinated position during the conference. In the run-up to the COP21, she also represented the EU at many bilateral meetings and high-level conferences such as the Petersberg Climate Dialogue and the Major Economies Forum on Energy and Climate (MEF).

John Cooper
John Cooper

Executive Director of FuelsEurope

Show more information on John Cooper

John Cooper has extensive experience of the private energy sector. He worked for 27 years at BP, where he held several commercial, technical and policy leadership roles, most recently leading BP’s strategy for compliance with renewables and GHG regulation in European transport fuels. In April 2015, he was appointed Director General of FuelsEurope and Concawe, representing the interest of 40 companies operating refineries in the EU.

Fredrick Federley
Fredrick Federley

Member of the European Parliament Committee on Industry, Research and Energy and Substitute of the Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety

Show more information on Fredrick Federley
Mechthild Wörsdörfer
Mechthild Wörsdörfer

Deputy Director-General for Energy at the European Commission

Show more information on Mechthild Wörsdörfer

Building on her decades-long experience in energy policy, Mechthild Wörsdörfer is in charge of the European Commission’s work on the coordination of the just and green energy transition. Before taking up her current position, she worked as the director for sustainability, technology and outlooks at the International Energy Agency. Prior to that, Wörsdörfer worked on a wide range of energy files at the European Commission, from renewables, energy efficiency and innovation to the 2030 Energy and Climate Framework. She previously served in the cabinet of Erkki Liikanen, during his term as European Commissioner for Enterprise Policy and Information Society.

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