Lessons from History: 20 years after the end of the Kosovo* conflict

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Lessons from History: 20 years after the end of the Kosovo conflict

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In an era where our security environment seems increasingly and ever-more rapidly subject to complex, global and interconnected challenges, it is important to regularly ‘go back to basics’: take a step back and understand history’s profound effects on our world, allowing us to better prepare for the future. Friends of Europe will look back at previous efforts in history to make peace and the lessons we can draw from those experiences to solve today’s conflicts.

With 20 years after the end of the Kosovo* conflict, this event will explore the response by the international community to the conflict, their successes and failures as well as the aftermath of their intervention in order to draw conclusions and lessons for today’s transnational and multi-faceted conflicts.

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*For the European Union, this designation used is without prejudice to positions on status, and is in line with UN Security Council resolution 1244/99 and the International Court of Justice Opinion on the Kosovo declaration of independence. For the United Nations Development Programme, references to Kosovo in this document accordingly shall be understood to be in the context of Security Council resolution 1244 (1999)


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Lessons from History: 20 years after the end of the Kosovo* conflict Expand Lessons from History: 20 years after the end of the Kosovo* conflict

In our series of ‘Lessons from History’ we take a step back and understand history’s profound effects on our world, allowing us to better prepare for future crises.

Our second event in the series will explore lessons from the Kosovo conflict and the international community’s response: In the wake of this conflict and the failure of the international community to respond to the Rwandan Genocide and the massacre at Srebrenica, the Responsibility to Protect (R2P) was adopted, equipping the international community with the means to protect people from genocide, war crimes, ethnic cleansing and crimes against humanity. With a focus on the direct and indirect outcomes of the Kosovo conflict and reflecting on the responses by the international community we aim to uncover and share the lessons learned with the audience.

  • To what extent did the Kosovo* conflict shape the EU’s and NATO’s role as security actors?
  • How did the failures and successes in the efforts to end the conflict change the notion and approach of conflict prevention and peace building?
  • What role does the legacy of the conflict play for the region and for Europe more generally today?

*For the European Union, this designation used is without prejudice to positions on status, and is in line with UN Security Council resolution 1244/99 and the International Court of Justice Opinion on the Kosovo declaration of independence. For the United Nations Development Programme, references to Kosovo in this document accordingly shall be understood to be in the context of Security Council resolution 1244 (1999)

Speakers

Mats Berdal

Professor of Security and Development at the Department of War Studies, King’s College London

Andrew Gray

EU editor for POLITICO Europe

Moderator

Jamie Shea

Senior Fellow at Friends of Europe and Former Deputy Assistant Secretary General for Emerging Security Challenges at NATO (2010-2018)

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Speakers

Speakers

Mats Berdal
Mats Berdal

Professor of Security and Development at the Department of War Studies, King’s College London

Show more information on Mats Berdal

Mats Berdal is a Professor of Security and Development at the Department of War Studies, King’s College London, where he is the Director of the Conflict, Security and Development Research Group (CSDRG) . From 2000 to 2003 he was Director of Studies at the International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS). He has published extensively on the subject of UN peacebuilding interventions after the end of the Cold War and the comparative study of civil wars.

Andrew Gray
Andrew Gray

EU editor for POLITICO Europe

Show more information on Andrew Gray

Andrew Gray is EU editor for POLITICO Europe. He spent 15 years at Reuters as a correspondent and bureau chief, with postings in Germany, Geneva, the Balkans, West Africa, London and Washington, where he covered the Pentagon. He was based in Kosovo from June 1999 to October 2000 before moving to Belgrade, where he served as chief correspondent for the Balkans until 2004. He was also the supervising editor for a fellowship program that gives journalists from the Balkans the chance to work on in-depth international stories.

Photo of Jamie Shea
Jamie Shea

Senior Fellow at Friends of Europe and Former Deputy Assistant Secretary General for Emerging Security Challenges at NATO (2010-2018)

Show more information on Jamie Shea

Retiring from NATO in September 2018 after 38 years at the organisation, Jamie Shea has occupied a number of senior positions at NATO across a wide range of areas, including external relations, press and media, and policy planning. As NATO’s spokesperson, he was the face of the Alliance during the Bosnia and Kosovo conflicts. He later worked as the Director of Policy Planning in the private office of former Secretary General Rasmussen during the preparation of NATO’s 2010 Strategic Concept. Shea is also a regular lecturer and conference speaker on NATO and European security affairs.

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