Dealing with far-right radicalisation and disinformation

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Peace, Security & Defence
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Dealing with far-right radicalisation and disinformation

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The event will take place on zoom but will also be available to a wider audience via livestream.
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Far-right radicalisation is often enabled through disinformation campaigns circulating distrust towards states and institutions, adding fuel to existing crises and targeting disenfranchised citizens. The evolution of social media platforms as a means to disseminate information has enhanced the influence of these campaigns. Combined with a major crisis or upheaval, this is the perfect storm, allowing certain actors to exploit fear, anger and confusion to advance their own agendas and contribute to the growth of far-right radicalisation.

Most far-right radicalisation in the West is based on the narrative of a long-dominant white population’s fear of losing their place in the middle class or losing their majority status as Europe and North America become more racially diverse. During the worst days of the COVID-19 pandemic, the link between far-right groups and conspiracy theories became obvious. Social media is the most effective tool for spreading disinformation, planning and financing events, and recruiting and radicalising people by stoking fear and developing common ground – even if the initial contact is not directly related to far-right ideology. Radicalisation develops gradually from sympathy for right-wing ideas into more active participation. Disinformation campaigns aim at establishing a broad base of sympathisers, creating a community to justify radical ideas. Simple, causal explanations for complex issues can be employed, generalising personal experiences and often scapegoating migrants or other minorities.

Countering violent extremism goes hand in hand with discrediting disinformation. However, governments and institutions lack power over the social media conglomerates with the power to monitor information. Governments are in urgent need of new and creative ways to tackle disinformation campaigns and combat radicalisation at every stage. If they are unsuccessful, the emergence of new technologies like Artificial Intelligence (AI) has the potential to stoke even more fear and anger.


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Schedule

Schedule

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Dealing with far-right radicalisation and disinformation Expand Dealing with far-right radicalisation and disinformation

Questions include:

  • What are some examples of best practices from civil society and the private sector to counter disinformation campaigns and prevent radicalisation, and how can EU institutions and member states better cooperate with them?
  • How can the EU counter conspiracy theories effectively and stop far-right groups from using them as a recruitment and radicalisation tool?
  • How can digitalisation enhance democratic engagement so that people feel more empowered and deliver off-ramps for the different stages of the radicalisation process?

speakers

Sasha Havlicek

Co-founder and CEO of the Institute for Strategic Dialogue (ISD)

Fadi Quran

Campaign Director at Avaaz and 2017 MENA Young Leader

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Speakers

Speakers

Sasha Havlicek
Sasha Havlicek

Co-founder and CEO of the Institute for Strategic Dialogue (ISD)

Show more information on Sasha Havlicek

As ISD’s founding CEO, Sasha Havlicek leads the organisation’s pioneering programmes, advising governments and working with businesses and civil society to deliver solutions to conflict, extremism and terrorism. She has spearheaded the largest global network of former extremists (AVE) in partnership with Google’s Jigsaw; the Strong Cities Network, the first global counter-extremism cities network; and the Innovation Hub, a partnership with Facebook, Google and Twitter to counter extremists’ online efforts. She recently launched with Sheryl Sandberg the Online Civil Courage Initiative, aimed at challenging hate speech and extremism online.  

Fadi Quran
Fadi Quran

Campaign Director at Avaaz and 2017 MENA Young Leader

Show more information on Fadi Quran

Fadi Quran is a leading figure in Palestine, committed to achieving freedom, justice and dignity for the Palestinian people. As Campaign Director at Avaaz, a global online civic movement, he is responsible for the organisation’s campaigning and investigative efforts on issues including human rights, democracy, poverty and conflict. His leadership has helped push for legislation on Big Tech and he has featured in The New York Times, The Washington Post and BBC, among other news outlets. Fadi is a community organiser for Popular Struggle, a policy member of the Al-Shabaka Palestinian Policy Network and a former United Nations advocacy officer. In addition to his work in advocacy and international law, Fadi is also a renewable energy entrepreneur in MENA, with a focus on shifting the region away from fossil fuels. He has founded two companies, bringing wind and solar energy power to Palestine and other countries in the region.

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