Cross-border crime and corruption in Europe: What next after the Stockholm Programme?

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Peace, Security & Defence
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Cross-border crime and corruption in Europe: What next after the Stockholm Programme?

Summary

Cross-border crime and corruption in Europe: what next after the Stockholm Programme?

About

About

Whether it is combating terrorism or fighting organised crime, ranging from drugs or human trafficking to cyber-attacks, the security of Europe’s citizens is at the heart of current European policy.. As the Stockholm programme draws to an end, the European Commission, in partnership with the Security & Defence Agenda and Friends of Europe, is spearheading  a consultation process to define  the next steps.

Bringing together key stakeholders from the defence, diplomacy and development communities as well as academia and civil society representatives, the consultation process will  seek to come up with  innovative solutions on the future shape and contents of the the post-2014 Stockholm framework.. These consultations include the organisation of of two workshops: The workshop in Rome , held on 25 November 2013, looked at issues related to counter terrorism and radicalisation, cyber-crime and cyber-security and crisis management. The workshop in Berlin  on 21 January 2014 will focus on “white collar” and organised crime as well as the trafficking of human beings, arms and drugs.

The Stockholm programme has greatly helped to  to improve cooperation in the area of freedom, security and justice among national authorities. Whether it is  human trafficking, arms and drugs or corruption and “white collar” crime, the European Commission has taken several measures over the last five years  to put in place the necessary instruments – ranging from legislation and EU directives to EU strategies and policies –  to tackle these challenges. However Europeans’ security and human rights continue to be at risk and organised crime continues to threaten the security of European citizens, businesses, state institutions as well as the economy..

A recently released report by the Hertie School of Governance in Berlin states that corruption costs EU Member States 323 billion euros annually, with a number of countries showing a deep-rooted lack of accountability and transparency leading to financial inefficiency. Europe is also one of the biggest world markets for trafficking in human beings, arms and drugs. In 2011  more than 5000 murders were committed in the EU with firearms (around 20% of all murders). Several thousand people are  trafficked to or within the EU  every year. . These cross-border challenges require joint solutions. Should the EU develop a new and improved set of tools, priorities and synergies? Or is more cooperation needed among member states and with other international actors?

The workshops will examine these issues and look at horizontal themes, ranging from implementation of existing measures to the development of new responses to internal security threats.  Discussions will begin with a strategic brainstorming on  future challenges to European security and the tools needed to address them.; it will continue with a critical analysis of the achievements and the challenges of the Stockholm programme, and, finally,  it will look at ways of developing these ow to develop tools from the EU’s existing toolbox.

Schedule

Schedule

SESSION I: PREPARING FOR FUTURE THREATS
Expand SESSION I: PREPARING FOR FUTURE THREATS

What key security challenges will Europe face in the coming 10 to 20 years? What is the state of play on the implementation of existing EU rules? Has Europe done its homework as regards security challenges linked to “white collar” and organised crime as well as the trafficking of human beings, arms and drugs?  How can these instruments be made flexible enough to respond to transnational threats?

Speakers

Rob Wainwright

Executive Director of the European Union Agency for Law Enforcement Cooperation (Europol)

Peter Henzler

Vice-President, German Federal Police

Wolfgang Gotz

Director, European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction

Mark Pieth

Chair, OECD Working Group on Bribery in International Business Transactions, Professor of Criminal Law and Criminology at the University of Basel

Anna Alvazzi del Frate

Research Director, Small Arms Survey, Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva, Switzerland

Moderator

Giles Merritt

Founder

Coffee break
SESSION II: WHAT INTERNAL SECURITY TOOLS FOR 2020?
Expand SESSION II: WHAT INTERNAL SECURITY TOOLS FOR 2020?

What are the success and failures of the  Stockholm programme? Which important  best practices that have been identified so far can be applied to other areas? What are the existing gaps in the strategies and policies already put in place at the European level? How can these challenges be addressed in the future?

Speakers

Jean-Baptiste Carpentier

Director of TRACFIN, Ministry of Finances and Economy, France

Maria Grazia Giammarinaro

OSCE Special Representative and Co-ordinator for Combating Trafficking in Human Beings

Sonia Alfano

MEP, Alliance of Liberals and Democrats for Europe (ALDE), Chair of Special Committee on Organised Crime, Corruption and Money Laundering

Michele Coninsx

President, Eurojust

Cobus de Swardt

Managing Director, Transparency International

Moderator

Giles Merritt

Founder

Lunch break
SESSION III: NEXT STEPS FOR THE EU TOOLBOX
Expand SESSION III: NEXT STEPS FOR THE EU TOOLBOX

How can the EU Justice and Home Affairs toolbox  be adjusted to future threats? Is there a need for deeper harmonisation of national frameworks and increased cooperation between agencies? Does Europe need radically new instruments or can the existent ones still be used? In a continuously changing environment should the EU continue to develop long term strategies? Or are  short term policies better suited to tackle new challenges?

Speakers

Reinhard Priebe

Director, Crisis Management and Internal security, DG Home Affairs

Thierry Balzacq

Tocqueville Professor of International Relations at the University of Namur, Director of “l’espace européen de liberté, de sécurité et de justice” programme in the Centre d’études européennes de Sciences Po Paris

Francois Vincke

Chairman of the Anti-Corruption Commission, International Chamber of Commerce

Colette de Troy

Director, Observatory on Violence against Women, European Women Lobby

Martin Mrčela

Chairman of GRECO (Group of States Against Corruption), Council of Europe

Moderator

Giles Merritt

Founder

Speakers

Speakers

Photo of Rob Wainwright
Rob Wainwright

Executive Director of the European Union Agency for Law Enforcement Cooperation (Europol)

Show more information on Rob Wainwright

During his tenure as Director of Europol, Rob Wainwright has ensured Europol’s position in the EU Policy Cycle for serious and organised crime and secured the establishment of the European Cybercrime Centre, the European Counter Terrorism Centre, and the European Migrant Smuggling Centre. Wainwright’s career began as a British intelligence analyst, focusing on counterterrorism and organised crime. He later served as Head of the UK Liaison Bureau at Europol and Director International of the UK Serious Organised Crime Agency.

Mark Pieth

Chair, OECD Working Group on Bribery in International Business Transactions, Professor of Criminal Law and Criminology at the University of Basel

Show more information on Mark Pieth
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Thierry Balzacq

Tocqueville Professor of International Relations at the University of Namur, Director of “l’espace européen de liberté, de sécurité et de justice” programme in the Centre d’études européennes de Sciences Po Paris

Show more information on Thierry Balzacq
Giles Merritt
Giles Merritt

Founder

Show more information on Giles Merritt

Giles Merritt is the Founder of Friends of Europe, and was its Secretary General between 1999 and 2015, and its Chairman between 2016 and 2020.

A former Financial Times Brussels Correspondent, Giles Merritt is a journalist, author and broadcaster who has for over four decades specialised in European public policy questions. In 2010 he was named by the Financial Times as one of its 30 most influential “Eurostars”, together with the European Commission’s President and NATO’s Secretary General.

Giles Merritt joined the Financial Times in 1968, and from 1972 until 1983 he was successively FT correspondent in Paris, Dublin/Belfast, and Brussels. From 1984 to 2010 he was a columnist for the International Herald Tribune (IHT), where his Op-Ed page articles ranged widely across EU political and economic issues.

In 1982 he published “World Out of Work”, an award-winning study of unemployment in industrialised countries. In 1991, his second book “The Challenge of Freedom” about the difficulties facing post-communist Eastern Europe was published in four languages. His book “Slippery Slope: Europe’s Troubled Future” (Oxford University Press 2016), was shortlisted for the European Book Prize.

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