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FRANCE AND GERMANY – Driving European defence

This event is co-organised with the Friedrich Ebert Stiftung and IRSEM.
Please note that the event takes place in Berlin, Germany.

The European continent must plan and prepare for an unpredictable world. A changing leadership in the United States, globally increased defence spending, contested multilateralism, violent conflicts, social inequality, mass migration, Brexit, and Russia’s increased assertiveness beg the question: what role for Europe as a regional and global security actor?

How closely aligned are French and German views on these issues? Can the two countries be the cornerstone for the EU’s proposed ‘Defence Union’? What other coalitions exist within the EU, such as the Weimar Triangle or the Visegrad Four? What are the implications if the UK’s military strengths can no longer be counted on? Is Permanent Structured Cooperation (PESCO) now the best way forward? Is there common ground for stronger coordination between France’s and Germany’s investment and modernization priorities? How far are these aligned with European priorities?

IMAGE CREDIT: Shutterstock

Programme

10.15 – 11.00 Welcome coffee and registration of participants

The current geopolitical landscape calls for a stronger security emphasis in Europe. Instability the EU’s neighbourhood and beyond, globally increased defence spending, contested multilateralism, violent conflicts, social inequality and mass migration, combined with Brexit, unclear directions from the new U.S. administration and increasing Russian are cause for concern. While the EU’s new global strategy paves the way, details of implementation are yet to become clear. How prepared is Europe to face these challenges?

How will the 2017 elections in France and Germany impact the two countries’ foreign policies? How closely aligned are French and German views of Europe’s role as a regional and global security provider? Can the two countries be the cornerstone for the EU’s proposed ‘Defence Union’? What other coalitions exist within the EU, and do informal groups such as the Weimar Triangle or the Visegrad Four carry weight in setting European defence priorities? What are the implications if the UK’s military strengths can no longer be counted on?

12.30 – 13.30 Networking Lunch

The barriers to a rapid strengthening of Europeans’ weakened military outreach appear daunting. Money alone won’t solve the problem, but must be combined with strategic upgrade of CSDP, institutional reform and the harmonisation of capability development. Is Permanent Structured Cooperation (PESCO) now the best way forward? Is there common ground for stronger coordination between France’s and Germany’s investment and modernization priorities? How far are these aligned with European, and notably EDA priorities? Will the promised yearly €500m in EU support under the new European Defence Action Plan prove a significant addition to the €20bn Europe’s defence industries already spend on R&D?

Moderated by
Pauline Massart / Deputy Director Security & Geopolitics, Friends of Europe
Uwe Optenhögel / Director EU-Office, Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung

Speakers

  • Niels Annen

    Foreign Affairs Spokesman of the Social Democratic Party of Germany (SPD) Group in the Bundestag

  • Michèle Auga

    Head of Department for Western Europe and North America at the Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung Berlin

  • Hans-Peter Bartels

    Parliamentary Commissioner for the Armed Forces in the Bundestag

  • Philippe Etienne

    French Ambassador to Germany

  • Alain Le Roy

    French Ambassador and former Secretary General of the European External Action Service (EEAS)

  • Claudia Major

    Senior Associate at the Stiftung Wissenschaft und Politik (SWP)

  • Alice Pannier

    Researcher at the Institut de Recherche Stratégique de l'École Militaire (IRSEM)

  • Paul Taylor

    European Affairs Editor at Politico, Author of Friends of Europe report on France and the future of European defence
    Paul Taylor writes the ‘Europe at Large’ column for POLITICO and is a freelance writer and broadcaster based in Paris. He was previously the European Affairs Editor at Reuters and served as a foreign correspondent for 39 years in Europe and the Middle East. Taylor’s assignments have included covering the Iranian revolution, the Cold War Euromissile crisis, the first Palestinian intifada, the 1991 Gulf War, German reunification, the Maastricht summit, France in the 1990s, the 2000 Camp David summit, EU enlargement, the eurozone crisis and the fall of the Muslim Brotherhood government in Egypt.

  • Pauline Massart

    Deputy Director, Security and Geopolitics at Friends of Europe, and Vice-President of Women in International Security (WIIS) Brussels
    Pauline Massart leads Friends of Europe’s Peace, Security and Defence work, developing the work programme, projects and partnerships on global peace, security and defence issues. She has spearheaded projects such as the think-tank’s 2011 global cyber-scorecard, as well as a global online brainstorm that gathers thousands of security experts from across the globe. Massart is also Vice President for Operations and Outreach at Women in International Security Brussels (WIIS-Brussels).

  • Uwe Optenhögel

    Head of the Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung’s Brussels Office

Partners

fes-logo_15mm_102006   2016_09_06_logo_irsem_fond_blanc_1000x552

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